The tulips + Eco-Lawn experiment in progress

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Ecotulips

At the request of my friend Miriam Goldberger, co-founder and owner of Wildflower Farm, I have sown Eco-Lawn grass seed in my forced tulips, which are coming up now. Eco-Lawn is a fescue grass that, according to the WF site, is drought-tolerant, can be left unmown, and grows in shade. I can't attest to these claims, because I don't have a lawn and have never tried to grow or maintain one.

But this seemed like an interesting project. So far I like the effect of this grass. I have grown it in pots outside—again, just for fun—and of course it gets much thicker in those conditions. For grass grown indoors in winter, I think it's doing pretty well.

I'll post again when we have blooms on this and the other pots of tulips/grass I have going.

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Elizabeth Licata

Elizabeth Licata has been a regular writer for  Garden Rant since 2007, after contributing a guest rant about the overuse of American flags in front gardens. She lives and gardens in Buffalo, N.Y., which, far from the frozen wasteland many assume it to be, is a lush paradise of gardens, historic architecture, galleries, museums, theaters, and fun. As editor of Buffalo Spree magazine,  Licata helps keep Western New Yorkers apprised about what is happening in their region. She is also a freelance writer and art curator, who’s been published in Fine Gardening, Horticulture, ArtNews, Art in America, the Village Voice, and many other publications. She does regularly radio segments for the local NPR affiliate, WBFO.

Licata is involved with Garden Walk Buffalo, the largest free garden tour in the US and possibly the world,and has written the text for a book about Garden Walk. She has also written and edited several art-related books. Contact Elizabeth: ealicata at yahoo.com

2 COMMENTS

  1. Fescue if left unmowed, especially creeping types, make a mounded unkempt meadow lawn look. However creeping fescues are hardly tolerant of dry weather. Perhaps it is the “tall” fescue kind that will grow in shade and is amazingly drought tolerant.

    However due to it’s clumpy coarse texture I doubt it will make an attractive unmowed lawn

    The TROLL

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